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National Licorice Day

Elizabeth Verbeten, Writer

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On April 12th, licorice lovers celebrated their favorite delicious snack even more than usual. April 12th is National Licorice Day. Licorice International blessed us with this holiday in 2004 as a way to celebrate the rich history, health benefits, and world renown of black licorice.

Licorice is extracted from the licorice plant and not only can be used for the candy loved by so many, but also for drink flavoring, licorice tea being particularly popular, and medical purposes.

Licorice has a long history in the medical field, having been used for eons as a health tonic, blood purifier, a source of relief from sore throat and internal inflammations, and, when mixed with honey, used as a healer of sores and wounds. Modern medical researchers are still documenting the effects licorice has on the body. Licorice has demonstrated anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antimicrobial, and blood-pressure increasing properties.

But above all, licorice lovers appreciate the confectionary beauty of the chewy sweet. The sweet treat is made from licorice roots that are dissolved in water with other ingredients such as sugar and a binding article; starch, flour, gum arabic, or gelatin and heated to 275 °F. From there the mixture is poured into molds made by impressing holes into a container filled with starch. It is then dried and sprayed with beeswax to make the surface shiny.

Freshman Bobby Walsh celebrated by remembering how he gave licorice to his dog as a child, “On my dog’s birthday I would give her the long ropes of licorice. And sometimes she would go into my backpack and eat all of the licorice there, so I didn’t get any,” Walsh relayed with a happy grin.

Long term substitute Mr.OKeefe was happily surprised to learn that there was a National Licorice Day, and interested in the fact that non-black licorice doesn’t contain licorice, “Well then I guess I don’t really like licorice,” Mr.OKeefe joked, “Although I do like cherry Twizzlers.”

How did you celebrate this National Licorice Day? By eating licorice till you can’t eat no more? By wearing licorice memorabilia? Most of all just try to appreciate the delicious flavor and rich history of the greatest chewy confection, licorice!

 

Kawish, Samira. “All About Licorice.” Candy Professor. N.p., 23 Feb. 2010. Web. 28 Apr. 2017.

“Liquorice (confectionery).” Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 07 Apr. 2017. Web. 28 Apr. 2017.

“Liquorice.” Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 27 Apr. 2017. Web. 28 Apr. 2017.

“Treat Yourself to the World’s Best Licorice.” National Licorice Day – Licorice International. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Apr. 2017.

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National Licorice Day